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  Use of strategic short term grazing of bioactive forages in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes: Trichostrongylus colubriformis and Teladorsagia circumcincta in organic lambs
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Lundberg, Sara1, Forfatter
Thamsborg, Stig Milan1, Vejleder
Greer, Andrew1, Vejleder
Tilknytninger:
1Det Biovidenskabelige Fakultet, København, Danmark, diskurs:7002              
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 Abstract: Nematode parasitism of small ruminants is a major threat to ruminant farming systems throughout the world, including New Zealand. Traditionally, parasite control has been performed through anthelmintic treatments however the frequent use of anthelmintics has resulted in an increasing resistance against the drugs. This is now a significant problem in most livestock producing countries. Numerous non-chemical methods have been engaged to control nematodes in small ruminants including; grazing management, supplementary feeding, biological control and bioactive forages. There have been field studies which have shown that grazing sheep on certain bioactive forages may reduce their worm burdens and increase their performance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of targeted selective treatment using strategic short term grazing on chicory, plantain and red clover on faecal egg count and liveweight gain in organic lambs. The trial was performed at Lincoln University, New Zealand during December 2011- March 2012. Sixty male Coopworth lambs were used in the study. The lambs were split into two groups of thirty lambs and introduced to two separate paddocks with ryegrass (Lolium perenne cv. Grasslands Nui) and white clover (Trifolium repens cv. Grasslands Huia) contaminated with either Trichostrongylus colubriformis or Teladorsagia circumcincta. On a fortnightly basis, the lambs were weighed and removed from the groups. The lambs found not performing to a preset target weight were put to graze in two separate “hospital” paddocks containing ryegrass and mix of chicory (Cichorium intybus cv. Grasslands Puna), plantain (Plantago lanceolata cv. Grasslands Lancelot) and red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Minshan) with minimal contamination. Once they reached their target weight they were returned to graze in the main paddocks. Faecal samples were collected from each lamb fortnightly to determine the extent of parasitic infection. Nematode parasitism of small ruminants is a major threat to ruminant farmingsystems throughout the world, including New Zealand. Traditionally, parasite control has been performed through anthelmintic treatments however the frequent use of anthelmintics has resulted in an increasing resistance against the drugs. This is now a significant problem in most livestock producing countries. Numerous non-chemical methods have been engaged to control nematodes in small ruminants including; grazing management, supplementary feeding, biological control and bioactive forages. There have been field studies which have shown that grazing sheep on certain bioactive forages may reduce their worm burdens and increase their performance.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of targeted selective treatment using strategic short term grazing on chicory, plantain and red clover on faecal egg count and liveweight gain in organic lambs.The trial was performed at Lincoln University, New Zealand during December 2011- March 2012. Sixty male Coopworth lambs were used in the study. The lambs were split into two groups of thirty lambs and introduced to two separate paddocks with ryegrass (Lolium perenne cv. Grasslands Nui) and white clover (Trifolium repens cv. Grasslands Huia) contaminated with either Trichostrongylus colubriformis or Teladorsagia circumcincta. On a fortnightly basis, the lambs were weighed and removed from the groups. The lambs found not performing to a preset target weight were put to graze in two separate “hospital” paddocks containing ryegrass and mix of chicory (Cichorium intybus cv. Grasslands Puna), plantain (Plantago lanceolata cv. Grasslands Lancelot) and red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Minshan) with minimal contamination. Once they reached their target weight they were returned to graze in the main paddocks. Faecal samples were collected from each lamb fortnightly to determine the extent of parasitic infection. Nematode parasitism of small ruminants is a major threat to ruminant farming systems throughout the world, including New Zealand. Traditionally,parasite control has been performed through anthelmintic treatments however the frequent use of anthelmintics has resulted in an increasing resistance against the drugs. This is now a significant problem in most livestock producing countries. Numerous non-chemical methods have been engaged to control nematodes in small ruminants including; grazing management, supplementary feeding, biological control and bioactive forages. There have been field studies which have shown that grazing sheep on certain bioactive forages may reduce their worm burdens and increase their performance.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of targeted selective treatment using strategic short term grazing on chicory, plantain and red clover on faecal egg count and liveweight gain in organic lambs.The trial was performed at Lincoln University, New Zealand during December 2011- March 2012. Sixty male Coopworth lambs were used in the study. The lambs were split into two groups of thirty lambs and introduced to two separate paddocks with ryegrass (Lolium perenne cv. Grasslands Nui) and white clover (Trifolium repens cv. Grasslands Huia) contaminated with either Trichostrongylus colubriformis or Teladorsagia circumcincta. On a fortnightly basis, the lambs were weighed and removed from the groups. The lambs found not performing to a preset target weight were put to graze in two separate “hospital” paddocks containing ryegrass and mix of chicory (Cichorium intybus cv. Grasslands Puna), plantain (Plantago lanceolata cv. Grasslands Lancelot) and red clover (Trifolium pratense cv. Minshan) with minimal contamination. Once they reached their target weight they were returned to graze in the main paddocks. Faecal samples were collected from each lamb fortnightly to determine the extent of parasitic infection. Observations showed very poor growth of the bioactive forages and did not reveal any antiparasitic effect following time in the hospital paddocks. The most likely explanation for the lack of antiparasitic effect is the poor growth of the forages. The mean daily liveweight gain increased after periods in the hospital paddock which strongly suggests that grazing the lambs in the hospital paddocks did improve their performance. The increasing LWG seen in lambs after periods in the hospital paddocks is however more likely to be a result of grazing a pasture with lower contamination than being a result of the bioactive forages due to the poor growth of the forages. Based on these findings the overall conclusion is that it was not possible in this study to judge the effectiveness of the bioactive forages on liveweight gain or in reducing worm burdens.Observations showed very poor growth of the bioactive forages and did not reveal any antiparasitic effect following time in the hospital paddocks. The most likely explanation for the lack of antiparasitic effect is the poor growth of the forages. The mean daily liveweight gain increased after periods in the hospital paddock which strongly suggests that grazing the lambs in thehospital paddocks did improve their performance. The increasing LWG seen in lambs after periods in the hospital paddocks is however more likely to be a result of grazing a pasture with lower contamination than being a result of the bioactive forages due to the poor growth of the forages. Based on these findings the overall conclusion is that it was not possible in this study to judge the effectiveness of the bioactive forages on liveweight gain or in reducing worm burdens.Observations showed very poor growth of the bioactive forages and did not reveal any antiparasitic effect following time in the hospital paddocks. The most likely explanation for the lack of antiparasitic effect is the poor growth of the forages. The mean daily liveweight gain increased after periods in the hospital paddock which strongly suggests that grazing the lambs in the hospital paddocks did improve their performance. The increasing LWG seen in lambs after periods in the hospital paddocks is however more likely to be a result of grazing a pasture with lower contamination than being a result of the bioactive forages due to the poor growth of the forages. Based on these findings the overall conclusion is that it was not possible in this study to judge the effectiveness of the bioactive forages on liveweight gain or in reducing worm burdens.
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Sprog: English - eng
 Datoer: 2012
 Sider: 52 pages
 Publiceringsinfo: København, Danmark : Institut for Veterinær Sygdomsbiologi
 Indholdsfortegnelse: -
 Note: Veterinary Medicine, Veterinærmedicin, Final semester, Afsluttende semester
 Type: Speciale
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