de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean

Post

 
 Vis
  Ambiguous bodies?
Item is

Ophav

 Ophav:
Thomsen, Malene Renée1, Forfatter
Bone, Martyn1, Vejleder
Tilknytninger:
1Det Humanistiske Fakultet, Københavns Universitet, København, Danmark, diskurs:7035              
skjul Ophav
Vis Ophav

Indhold

Ukontrollerede emneord: -
 Abstract: This thesis is an exploration of the representation of racial identity in Frances E. W. Harper’s Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted (1892) and Pauline E. Hopkins’s Contending Forces: A Romance Illustrative of Negro Life North and South (1900). Through analyses of each novel’s mulatto protagonists, the thesis will draw parallels as well as identify significant differences between the two authors’ representations of racial identity. As both novels were written in an era permeated by issues pertaining to racial identity, the literary analyses will be historically grounded.
The first chapter will therefore set the scene for the subsequent analyses by tracing important social, legal and ideological developments pertaining to the identity of mixed-race Americans from the onset of slavery to the late 19th century. Moreover, it will account for developments and trends within the field of 19th century African-American intellectual thought and literature.
Chapter two is an analysis of Frances Harper’s Iola Leroy which focuses mainly on Marie and her daughter, Iola; the two figuring as the novel’s ante- and postbellum mulatta heroines respectively. The chapter specifically discusses Harper’s use of her near-white heroines in relation to two main themes, passing and “true womanhood”.
The third chapter is an analysis of primarily Grace and Sappho in Pauline Hopkins’s Contending Forces; the two being the novel’s antebellum and post-Reconstruction heroines respectively. The main focus of the analyses of Grace and Sappho is Hopkins’s use of mulattas both to undermine the concept of race and to claim entitlement to “true womanhood”. Parallels and contrasts with Iola Leroy will also be identified throughout this chapter
The historically grounded analyses of Harper and Hopkins’s literary representations of racial identity led to the following conclusions. Both novels represent mulatta rape victims as proving ultimately happy survivors who are decidedly “untragic”, thus offering an alternative to the tragic mulatta stereotype. Furthermore, Harper and Hopkins’s mulatta heroines embody a new black version of the ideal of “true womanhood”. They not only prove entitled to the label “true” but also redefine the ideal to include black and “fallen” women. Thus, both authors succeed in undermining their society’s popular racist stereotype of the lascivious black woman. This being said, the two novels differ significantly in their conceptualisation of racial identity. While Harper’s preoccupation with passing lets her merely redefine the meaning of blackness but not refute the existence of essential racial differences, Hopkins manages to represent race and thus also racial identity as a social construct with no biological or scientific foundation.
skjul Indhold
Vis Indhold

Filer

Navn:
Forside.pdf (Bilag)
Bemærkninger:
-
Tilgængelighed:
Offentlig
Mime-type / størrelse:
application/pdf / 78KB
Copyright dato:
-
Copyright information:
De fulde rettigheder til dette materiale tilhører forfatteren.
Navn:
Specialet.pdf (Hovedtekst)
Bemærkninger:
-
Tilgængelighed:
Offentlig
Mime-type / størrelse:
application/pdf / 763KB
Copyright dato:
-
Copyright information:
De fulde rettigheder til dette materiale tilhører forfatteren.
skjul Filer
Vis Filer

Basal

Bogmærk denne post: https://diskurs.kb.dk/item/diskurs:12113:5
 Type: Speciale
Alternativ titel: Mulatto characters and racial identity in Pauline Hopkin's "Contending forces" and Frances Harper's "Iola Leroy"
skjul Basal
Vis Basal

Links

Vis Links

Detaljer

Sprog: English - eng
 Datoer: 2010
 Sider: -
 Publiceringsinfo: København : Københavns Universitet
 Indholdsfortegnelse: -
 Note: -
 Type: Speciale
skjul Detaljer
Vis Detaljer

Kilde

Vis Kilde